Coronavirus and Water

This content originally appeared as a blog post on WaterWorld

A public health expert told us to take precautionary measures that seem more protective than needed.  Once an elevated level of protection is clearly necessary, it may well be too late.
By George Hawkins & Andy Kricun For most of us that means some level of social distancing.  Limiting interactions with others will help flatten the exposure curve.  For all of us, this step raises questions about maintaining food and other necessities – as well as what we would do if a loved one starts showing symptoms.
Which brings me to the question at hand – how is the Coronavirus impacting water utilities?  Treatment experts confirm that standard disinfection procedures will ensure that drinking water supplies do not harbor the virus and are safe.  There is concern about the potential for the virus in sewage, although most wastewater treatment plants also use chlorine disinfection, and the route to exposure is limited.
Our concern then is not about the virus in water supplies, and more on how to ensure the availability of critical operators of these systems and the chemicals, supplies and equipment that is necessary in their 24/7/365 work.
Handling emergencies and disasters with calm and excellence is in the DNA of water utilities.  Most have plans for how to manage and operate which govern at these moments, some of which are simply part of hard-won experience and others in written plans diligently followed when needed.
Except this moment is not like any other.  One of the best attributes for water utilities is how we come to the assistance of our brethren in a time of need.  This system works because disasters do not hit the entire country at the same time.  If a storm causes disruption in one area, utilities from outside that area step forward to help with back-up crews, supplies and equipment.  Almost every utility has been on both sides of this equation – sending or receiving help.
The challenge at this moment is that the hurricane of this virus is hitting the entire country, indeed the entire world, at virtually the same time.  How will utilities be able to come to the aid of their brethren in a world of quarantines and ubiquitous risk?  Where will a thinly staffed utility find back-up personnel support, back-up treatment supplies or other needed equipment when every utility will be worried about their own supplies and personnel.
This harsh reality emphasizes the importance of immediate and national implementation of a series of extraordinary measures.  We start with a proposed series of steps that can be taken on a national basis to support water utilities over the next weeks and months.  We follow with five steps utilities should adopt to improve their resilience to this crisis.  We hope this post triggers further discussion and exploration of the ideas we present.
Many utilities are already implementing some or most of these steps and more.  Larger utilities, simply due to their size, will have larger staffs to provide support, and larger inventories and financial resources.  The water world, though, is dominated by thousands of smaller water utilities that often rely on a handful of critical personnel and have limited financial resources or on-site inventory.
Restrictions of either supplies or personnel to these utilities could be devastating and hit suddenly and without warning.  The good news is that with additional thought and preparation we should be able to weather this storm.  The federal government can take the lead, working with the states, on the following steps: Document the critical chemical and other supplies that are needed in water treatment.
Identify appropriate long-term supplies and focus on procuring and stockpiling these materials.  Personnel who do this work should gain priority for protective gear.
Organize regional networks of expertise, which would enable properly protected experts to travel to areas that are facing a personnel shortage to provide temporary help.
Encourage regional networks among smaller utilities to share resources and personnel.  Safety equipment should also be prioritized for use in these circumstances.
Identify lower cost automation projects that can be implemented quickly that would enable utilities to operate remotely and/or with lower staffing levels.
Provide emergency funding and procurement procedures to enable these steps, particularly for utilities in underserved areas.
To provide context for these policy suggestions, we offer the following five steps that a utility should adopt to improve their ability to maintain critical services in the face of this unprecedented crisis.
Step 1: Communication and Outreach This is the place to start.  Communication means remaining informed of the latest credible information on the pandemic and its practical consequences to staff, customers and suppliers.  Rely on the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and state and local health authorities.
Implement an enhanced internal and external communications plan to keep everyone informed.
Identify back-up communication systems in the unlikely event that any existing systems fail.
Immediately expand virtual communication systems and remote options with staff.
Position utility leadership to be the face of communications on water issues to the media and customers.
Practice these messaging do’s during a crisis: Express that health and safety are the top priority.
Be clear that the utility is following guidance from the WHO, CDC and state and local health authorities.
Be transparent – be clear about what you know and do not know.
Be positive and reassuring, and project calm and control.
Promise to provide updates when available.
Provide a method of contact for questions.

Step 2: Personnel and Customer Safety and Redundancy Establish

test and implement systems that enable work from home and virtual meetings.
Send all non-essential employees to work from home.  If needed in the office, sequence work in shorter shifts with fewer employees on-site at any given time.
Adopt enhanced cleaning procedures for workspaces, vehicles, equipment with emphasis on essential workstations, equipment and operations.
Reduce or eliminate group meetings.  Conduct virtual meetings in every possible case.  For essential in-person meetings, practice social distancing and cleaning before and after meeting.
Reduce operation and maintenance crews to smallest number needed to accomplish work safely.
If possible, try to reduce shifts to a minimum and have key personnel, especially operators, in reserve.
For example, if a facility has 8 operators per shift, could it temporarily function with 5 until the crisis has eased.
Consider implementing reduced staffing programs commonly associated with off-shift and/or weekend work to the entire week.
Lab and non-essential maintenance should be reduced to a few times a week or less.
For smaller treatment facilities that are already run/overseen remotely on second and third shirts or weekends, expand this approach to several more days a week.
Probability of exposure to contagion will be reduced.
If personnel or their loved ones get sick, the utility has more personnel in reserve.
Consider limited virtual cross-training of personnel on critical functions.
Are there basic procedures or actions that can be handled by staff not usually assigned in those areas if needed.
Identify full range of staff that can be cross trained if needed in an emergency, including office personnel.
Eliminate in-person customer payments.  For those unable to pay in any other fashion, offer a grace period until restrictions are lifted.
Eliminate shut offs until restrictions are lifted.
Step 3: Identify, Inventory and Plan for Critical Supplies The issue here is redundancy of supplies, with emphasis on critical parts, chemicals and power.
Identify chemicals needed in treatment.
Confirm existing inventory.
Contact supplier to determine capability of securing additional supplies.
Consider enhancing back-up supplies on site.
Identify key equipment needed in both emergency response to upsets (water main breaks, sewer back-ups, equipment failure) and daily operations.
Identify any materials in limited supply.
Contact suppliers to determine ability and estimated time for resupplying if needed.
Be prepared for a reduced availability of calling on neighboring utilities for supplies given their own needs.
Identify key power needs and back-up power systems.  For existing diesel generators and similar equipment, review on-site fuel needs and ability to secure additional supplies.
Step 4: Procurement and Emergency Funding Implement or develop emergency procurement procedures to enable accelerated purchasing and adoption of needed equipment and practices.
Identify potential emergency funding needs – seek temporary lifting of debt caps or other funding limitations.
Access credit lines or other sources of short-term capital.
Identify and connect with contractors or suppliers that may be needed on an emergency basis.
Create a protocol in advance to be able to call on these resources quickly.
Step 5: Automation, Remote Sensing and Low Maintenance Operations Identify critical aspects within the system that need regular monitoring and inspection.
Determine whether remote sensing, remote alarms and monitoring can be implemented.
Enable remote sensing and alarms to be accessed either in the main control station or by remote management.
Examples: Wire pump station and treatment plant annunciators remotely to operators’ laptops so they can monitor pump station and treatment plant alarms from home.
Install cameras in plant control rooms that show the levels and monitors of critical process units so that they can be clearly seen by an operator from his/her laptop at home.   This could create a virtual control room.
Seek to have some personnel on-site or on call for actual adjustments.  Limit or prohibit capacity to change operational aspects remotely to limit cyber risks.
Integrate these practices with staff reduction plans noted above.
If plant staffing is reduced from 8 per shift to 5 and/or if weekend operating model extended to weekdays – remote monitoring can complement and enable visibility to monitor actions and target available resources.
On-site operators would make their visual inspections of equipment, like belt filter presses, that need to be seen in person.
Operations Management.  Remote monitoring combined with changing operating parameters to reduce maintenance needs.
Example: have all settling tanks available for operation so that if one breaks down, you can easily put or leave another tank in service.
Example: run all belt filter presses at medium speed (less likely to result in breakdown) than running a few at maximum speed.

We suggest these steps are for the short and intermediate term.  Over the longer term

a far-reaching automation program to provide resiliency is likely a necessary step not just to achieve efficiencies (the usual reason), but to provide continuity of operations in face of such a crisis.
Delivering clean water is a fundamental public health priority for homes, hospitals, senior centers and everywhere else.  An international hurricane like the Coronavirus will present unique and extraordinary challenges to the systems we have relied on for decades to support each other during emergencies.
With proper planning, preparation and execution, we can overcome those challenges and keep clean water flowing no matter what comes.

The post Coronavirus and Water appeared first on Jersey Water Works

.

Coronavirus and Water

This content originally appeared as a blog post on WaterWorld

A public health expert told us to take precautionary measures that seem more protective than needed.  Once an elevated level of protection is clearly necessary, it may well be too late.
By George Hawkins & Andy Kricun For most of us that means some level of social distancing.  Limiting interactions with others will help flatten the exposure curve.  For all of us, this step raises questions about maintaining food and other necessities – as well as what we would do if a loved one starts showing symptoms.
Which brings me to the question at hand – how is the Coronavirus impacting water utilities?  Treatment experts confirm that standard disinfection procedures will ensure that drinking water supplies do not harbor the virus and are safe.  There is concern about the potential for the virus in sewage, although most wastewater treatment plants also use chlorine disinfection, and the route to exposure is limited.
Our concern then is not about the virus in water supplies, and more on how to ensure the availability of critical operators of these systems and the chemicals, supplies and equipment that is necessary in their 24/7/365 work.
Handling emergencies and disasters with calm and excellence is in the DNA of water utilities.  Most have plans for how to manage and operate which govern at these moments, some of which are simply part of hard-won experience and others in written plans diligently followed when needed.
Except this moment is not like any other.  One of the best attributes for water utilities is how we come to the assistance of our brethren in a time of need.  This system works because disasters do not hit the entire country at the same time.  If a storm causes disruption in one area, utilities from outside that area step forward to help with back-up crews, supplies and equipment.  Almost every utility has been on both sides of this equation – sending or receiving help.
The challenge at this moment is that the hurricane of this virus is hitting the entire country, indeed the entire world, at virtually the same time.  How will utilities be able to come to the aid of their brethren in a world of quarantines and ubiquitous risk?  Where will a thinly staffed utility find back-up personnel support, back-up treatment supplies or other needed equipment when every utility will be worried about their own supplies and personnel.
This harsh reality emphasizes the importance of immediate and national implementation of a series of extraordinary measures.  We start with a proposed series of steps that can be taken on a national basis to support water utilities over the next weeks and months.  We follow with five steps utilities should adopt to improve their resilience to this crisis.  We hope this post triggers further discussion and exploration of the ideas we present.
Many utilities are already implementing some or most of these steps and more.  Larger utilities, simply due to their size, will have larger staffs to provide support, and larger inventories and financial resources.  The water world, though, is dominated by thousands of smaller water utilities that often rely on a handful of critical personnel and have limited financial resources or on-site inventory.
Restrictions of either supplies or personnel to these utilities could be devastating and hit suddenly and without warning.  The good news is that with additional thought and preparation we should be able to weather this storm.  The federal government can take the lead, working with the states, on the following steps: Document the critical chemical and other supplies that are needed in water treatment.
Identify appropriate long-term supplies and focus on procuring and stockpiling these materials.  Personnel who do this work should gain priority for protective gear.
Organize regional networks of expertise, which would enable properly protected experts to travel to areas that are facing a personnel shortage to provide temporary help.
Encourage regional networks among smaller utilities to share resources and personnel.  Safety equipment should also be prioritized for use in these circumstances.
Identify lower cost automation projects that can be implemented quickly that would enable utilities to operate remotely and/or with lower staffing levels.
Provide emergency funding and procurement procedures to enable these steps, particularly for utilities in underserved areas.
To provide context for these policy suggestions, we offer the following five steps that a utility should adopt to improve their ability to maintain critical services in the face of this unprecedented crisis.
Step 1: Communication and Outreach This is the place to start.  Communication means remaining informed of the latest credible information on the pandemic and its practical consequences to staff, customers and suppliers.  Rely on the World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and state and local health authorities.
Implement an enhanced internal and external communications plan to keep everyone informed.
Identify back-up communication systems in the unlikely event that any existing systems fail.
Immediately expand virtual communication systems and remote options with staff.
Position utility leadership to be the face of communications on water issues to the media and customers.
Practice these messaging do’s during a crisis: Express that health and safety are the top priority.
Be clear that the utility is following guidance from the WHO, CDC and state and local health authorities.
Be transparent – be clear about what you know and do not know.
Be positive and reassuring, and project calm and control.
Promise to provide updates when available.
Provide a method of contact for questions.

Step 2: Personnel and Customer Safety and Redundancy Establish

test and implement systems that enable work from home and virtual meetings.
Send all non-essential employees to work from home.  If needed in the office, sequence work in shorter shifts with fewer employees on-site at any given time.
Adopt enhanced cleaning procedures for workspaces, vehicles, equipment with emphasis on essential workstations, equipment and operations.
Reduce or eliminate group meetings.  Conduct virtual meetings in every possible case.  For essential in-person meetings, practice social distancing and cleaning before and after meeting.
Reduce operation and maintenance crews to smallest number needed to accomplish work safely.
If possible, try to reduce shifts to a minimum and have key personnel, especially operators, in reserve.
For example, if a facility has 8 operators per shift, could it temporarily function with 5 until the crisis has eased.
Consider implementing reduced staffing programs commonly associated with off-shift and/or weekend work to the entire week.
Lab and non-essential maintenance should be reduced to a few times a week or less.
For smaller treatment facilities that are already run/overseen remotely on second and third shirts or weekends, expand this approach to several more days a week.
Probability of exposure to contagion will be reduced.
If personnel or their loved ones get sick, the utility has more personnel in reserve.
Consider limited virtual cross-training of personnel on critical functions.
Are there basic procedures or actions that can be handled by staff not usually assigned in those areas if needed.
Identify full range of staff that can be cross trained if needed in an emergency, including office personnel.
Eliminate in-person customer payments.  For those unable to pay in any other fashion, offer a grace period until restrictions are lifted.
Eliminate shut offs until restrictions are lifted.
Step 3: Identify, Inventory and Plan for Critical Supplies The issue here is redundancy of supplies, with emphasis on critical parts, chemicals and power.
Identify chemicals needed in treatment.
Confirm existing inventory.
Contact supplier to determine capability of securing additional supplies.
Consider enhancing back-up supplies on site.
Identify key equipment needed in both emergency response to upsets (water main breaks, sewer back-ups, equipment failure) and daily operations.
Identify any materials in limited supply.
Contact suppliers to determine ability and estimated time for resupplying if needed.
Be prepared for a reduced availability of calling on neighboring utilities for supplies given their own needs.
Identify key power needs and back-up power systems.  For existing diesel generators and similar equipment, review on-site fuel needs and ability to secure additional supplies.
Step 4: Procurement and Emergency Funding Implement or develop emergency procurement procedures to enable accelerated purchasing and adoption of needed equipment and practices.
Identify potential emergency funding needs – seek temporary lifting of debt caps or other funding limitations.
Access credit lines or other sources of short-term capital.
Identify and connect with contractors or suppliers that may be needed on an emergency basis.
Create a protocol in advance to be able to call on these resources quickly.
Step 5: Automation, Remote Sensing and Low Maintenance Operations Identify critical aspects within the system that need regular monitoring and inspection.
Determine whether remote sensing, remote alarms and monitoring can be implemented.
Enable remote sensing and alarms to be accessed either in the main control station or by remote management.
Examples: Wire pump station and treatment plant annunciators remotely to operators’ laptops so they can monitor pump station and treatment plant alarms from home.
Install cameras in plant control rooms that show the levels and monitors of critical process units so that they can be clearly seen by an operator from his/her laptop at home.   This could create a virtual control room.
Seek to have some personnel on-site or on call for actual adjustments.  Limit or prohibit capacity to change operational aspects remotely to limit cyber risks.
Integrate these practices with staff reduction plans noted above.
If plant staffing is reduced from 8 per shift to 5 and/or if weekend operating model extended to weekdays – remote monitoring can complement and enable visibility to monitor actions and target available resources.
On-site operators would make their visual inspections of equipment, like belt filter presses, that need to be seen in person.
Operations Management.  Remote monitoring combined with changing operating parameters to reduce maintenance needs.
Example: have all settling tanks available for operation so that if one breaks down, you can easily put or leave another tank in service.
Example: run all belt filter presses at medium speed (less likely to result in breakdown) than running a few at maximum speed.

We suggest these steps are for the short and intermediate term.  Over the longer term

a far-reaching automation program to provide resiliency is likely a necessary step not just to achieve efficiencies (the usual reason), but to provide continuity of operations in face of such a crisis.
Delivering clean water is a fundamental public health priority for homes, hospitals, senior centers and everywhere else.  An international hurricane like the Coronavirus will present unique and extraordinary challenges to the systems we have relied on for decades to support each other during emergencies.
With proper planning, preparation and execution, we can overcome those challenges and keep clean water flowing no matter what comes.

The post Coronavirus and Water appeared first on Jersey Water Works

.

Buying Bulk Fruit: How Long Will It Last

As of this writing, you — along with 90 percent of your fellow Americans — are under stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus pandemic.
The orders are in place to minimize physical contact between people which is how the virus spreads.
Under these stay-at-home orders, procuring food remains an essential activity.
For many people, food delivery is an attractive option.
For others, particularly those on a tight budget, and those who may view grocery shopping as one way to experience some sense of normalcy, their local food retailer is their source for food and other basics for isolating at home.
Grocery Store Visits: Planning for Perishables Buying food in bulk helps you limit the number of trips you need to make to the store, possibly reducing exposure to others who potentially could be carrying the coronavirus.
Fight BAC.
is here to help you out with a few essential tips on buying and storing bulk perishables, and how managing for food safety at home can keep you healthy and minimize food waste.
As you consider your food budget and how to efficiently use the food you have at home, we have some great resource suggestions: The USDA SNAP-ED program on meal planning and food budgeting.
My Plate is also a good source for tips on getting the most out of the food dollars you’re spending, plan meals for balanced nutrition, and reduce food waste.
Shopping for Perishables Now, let’s get shopping for those perishables.
Make a list of what you are planning to buy – and link it to specific meals or healthy snacks you’ve planned.
Check your refrigerator and freezer before your grocery trip: Do you really need more meat, poultry, fish and eggs.
Do you have items in the freezer that could be safely thawed and worked into a meal.
Before you go to the store is a great time to review what you have, and plan to buy items that allow you to put together a meal from the foods you have in the freezer.

BYOB: Bring Your Own Bags to the Grocery Store On your trips

plan to use your own bags – preferably quality canvas totes that have just been freshly laundered.
During the coronavirus outbreak some stores are not allowing customers to bring their own reusable totes.
You may want to check with your retailer before you go.
Now is a great time to get into the habit of laundering your totes on a regular basis – and not storing them in your trunk or outdoors.
Invest in sturdy totes that hold up well to laundering.
Buying Bulk Fruit: How Long Will It Last.
Retailers are reporting significantly increased sales of 5-pound bags of apples, oranges and other fresh produce.
Be aware of how long fruits and vegetables will last.
Plan to only buy what you will be able to consume or prepare for freezing.
Apples will last 3 weeks if stored at cool temperature, and 4-6 weeks if refrigerated.
Oranges and other citrus is best if eaten within 20 days if refrigerated.
Produce safety expert Trevor Suslow’s article covers safe handling of produce with coronavirus.
Remember – running tap water and clean hands are all you need to rinse your fresh fruits and vegetables.

Meat & Poultry Coronavirus Bulk-Buying Tips Buying larger family-sized trays of beef

pork, and chicken products is a common way to stock up, save money and have important basic protein on-hand for preparing family meals.
If you buy bulk meat and poultry, and you plan to divide it up for freezing portions, keep in mind this important and often-overlooked recommendation:  you want to retain the original package label.
Why.
Should there be a later recall of a meat or poultry product, you will then know if you have that product in your refrigerator based on identifying marks.

Keep the Label One suggestion is to cut the labeling off the large package

and put it, along with your store receipt if possible, in a plastic sandwich bag, marking on the bag the date of purchase.
Mark each of the portions you plan to freeze with an identifier so you will know it was part of the bulk tray you purchased.
When there is a recall of a meat or poultry product, you’ll be able to identify the product in your freezer if you’ve kept this label information.
The retailer imprint area should include the product name, brand name (not all meat and poultry is under a brand name), establishment number, product weight/size, lot code and date code.
Keep the label information in a safe place where you will be able to check it in the event of a recall involving products you commonly buy.
Wrapping Meat & Poultry Properly Wrap separate pieces of meat or poultry in foil or plastic bags, then place all wrapped or bagged portions into a larger freezer bag or foil wrap.
Press all air out of the bag or foil package and label the package with the identifying information and date you froze.
Even though these products can be kept for about a year in the freezer, for quality and flavor remember to plan meals that will use these products within about four months.
Fresh meat and poultry should not be kept in the refrigerator very long before you use it or freeze it.
For poultry just 1-2 days and for cuts of meat just 3-5 days maximum.
For safety and quality, make sure your refrigerator is at 40 F or below.
Your refrigerator temperature is important to reducing risk of food poisoning.
What About Deli Meats.
How Long Can I Store Them.
Once you open a package of deli meat, you have only 3-5 days to consume it.
Unopened deli meats keep at proper refrigeration for two weeks.
For your many other perishables, including eggs, dairy and other products, the USDA-Food Marketing Institute Food Keeper can help you navigate how long these foods can be kept for safety and quality.

The Food Keeper is available as a mobile app

too.
Everyone has a role in food safety.
And consider this: It is never a good time to have to visit your doctor because you or your loved one has a foodborne illness.
But now is an especially bad time to require medical attention.
Limit your exposure by staying home, and have the entire family be up-to-speed on the Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill practices.
Shelley Feist is Executive Director of the non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education.
.

Buying Bulk Fruit: How Long Will It Last

As of this writing, you — along with 90 percent of your fellow Americans — are under stay-at-home orders due to the coronavirus pandemic.
The orders are in place to minimize physical contact between people which is how the virus spreads.
Under these stay-at-home orders, procuring food remains an essential activity.
For many people, food delivery is an attractive option.
For others, particularly those on a tight budget, and those who may view grocery shopping as one way to experience some sense of normalcy, their local food retailer is their source for food and other basics for isolating at home.
Grocery Store Visits: Planning for Perishables Buying food in bulk helps you limit the number of trips you need to make to the store, possibly reducing exposure to others who potentially could be carrying the coronavirus.
Fight BAC.
is here to help you out with a few essential tips on buying and storing bulk perishables, and how managing for food safety at home can keep you healthy and minimize food waste.
As you consider your food budget and how to efficiently use the food you have at home, we have some great resource suggestions: The USDA SNAP-ED program on meal planning and food budgeting.
My Plate is also a good source for tips on getting the most out of the food dollars you’re spending, plan meals for balanced nutrition, and reduce food waste.
Shopping for Perishables Now, let’s get shopping for those perishables.
Make a list of what you are planning to buy – and link it to specific meals or healthy snacks you’ve planned.
Check your refrigerator and freezer before your grocery trip: Do you really need more meat, poultry, fish and eggs.
Do you have items in the freezer that could be safely thawed and worked into a meal.
Before you go to the store is a great time to review what you have, and plan to buy items that allow you to put together a meal from the foods you have in the freezer.

BYOB: Bring Your Own Bags to the Grocery Store On your trips

plan to use your own bags – preferably quality canvas totes that have just been freshly laundered.
During the coronavirus outbreak some stores are not allowing customers to bring their own reusable totes.
You may want to check with your retailer before you go.
Now is a great time to get into the habit of laundering your totes on a regular basis – and not storing them in your trunk or outdoors.
Invest in sturdy totes that hold up well to laundering.
Buying Bulk Fruit: How Long Will It Last.
Retailers are reporting significantly increased sales of 5-pound bags of apples, oranges and other fresh produce.
Be aware of how long fruits and vegetables will last.
Plan to only buy what you will be able to consume or prepare for freezing.
Apples will last 3 weeks if stored at cool temperature, and 4-6 weeks if refrigerated.
Oranges and other citrus is best if eaten within 20 days if refrigerated.
Produce safety expert Trevor Suslow’s article covers safe handling of produce with coronavirus.
Remember – running tap water and clean hands are all you need to rinse your fresh fruits and vegetables.

Meat & Poultry Coronavirus Bulk-Buying Tips Buying larger family-sized trays of beef

pork, and chicken products is a common way to stock up, save money and have important basic protein on-hand for preparing family meals.
If you buy bulk meat and poultry, and you plan to divide it up for freezing portions, keep in mind this important and often-overlooked recommendation:  you want to retain the original package label.
Why.
Should there be a later recall of a meat or poultry product, you will then know if you have that product in your refrigerator based on identifying marks.

Keep the Label One suggestion is to cut the labeling off the large package

and put it, along with your store receipt if possible, in a plastic sandwich bag, marking on the bag the date of purchase.
Mark each of the portions you plan to freeze with an identifier so you will know it was part of the bulk tray you purchased.
When there is a recall of a meat or poultry product, you’ll be able to identify the product in your freezer if you’ve kept this label information.
The retailer imprint area should include the product name, brand name (not all meat and poultry is under a brand name), establishment number, product weight/size, lot code and date code.
Keep the label information in a safe place where you will be able to check it in the event of a recall involving products you commonly buy.
Wrapping Meat & Poultry Properly Wrap separate pieces of meat or poultry in foil or plastic bags, then place all wrapped or bagged portions into a larger freezer bag or foil wrap.
Press all air out of the bag or foil package and label the package with the identifying information and date you froze.
Even though these products can be kept for about a year in the freezer, for quality and flavor remember to plan meals that will use these products within about four months.
Fresh meat and poultry should not be kept in the refrigerator very long before you use it or freeze it.
For poultry just 1-2 days and for cuts of meat just 3-5 days maximum.
For safety and quality, make sure your refrigerator is at 40 F or below.
Your refrigerator temperature is important to reducing risk of food poisoning.
What About Deli Meats.
How Long Can I Store Them.
Once you open a package of deli meat, you have only 3-5 days to consume it.
Unopened deli meats keep at proper refrigeration for two weeks.
For your many other perishables, including eggs, dairy and other products, the USDA-Food Marketing Institute Food Keeper can help you navigate how long these foods can be kept for safety and quality.

The Food Keeper is available as a mobile app

too.
Everyone has a role in food safety.
And consider this: It is never a good time to have to visit your doctor because you or your loved one has a foodborne illness.
But now is an especially bad time to require medical attention.
Limit your exposure by staying home, and have the entire family be up-to-speed on the Clean, Separate, Cook and Chill practices.
Shelley Feist is Executive Director of the non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education.
.

KPA EtherCAT: industrial network solutions and tools

Industrial Automation Show (IAS) was held in Shanghai from 17 to 21 September 2019

There, more than 300 manufacturing and product companies demonstrated their innovative solutions for industrial automation and robotics.

Koenig-pa GmbH took part in IAS 2019 in cooperation with Hongke Technology Co.

Ltd., and successfully presented the following product lines: KPA Automation: a platform for industrial automation and control systems.
KPA EtherCAT: industrial network solutions and tools.

KPA Motion: a software library for motion control applications

.

KPA EtherCAT: industrial network solutions and tools

Industrial Automation Show (IAS) was held in Shanghai from 17 to 21 September 2019

There, more than 300 manufacturing and product companies demonstrated their innovative solutions for industrial automation and robotics.

Koenig-pa GmbH took part in IAS 2019 in cooperation with Hongke Technology Co.

Ltd., and successfully presented the following product lines: KPA Automation: a platform for industrial automation and control systems.
KPA EtherCAT: industrial network solutions and tools.

KPA Motion: a software library for motion control applications

.

develop your website using Scriptcase

Each market has a different kind of demand, thinking it is important to keep in mind that the type of content offered and the needs that each user must also differ.
When we talk about accounting firms relate the services they offer the corporate need.
The control of cash flow, for example, is a type of demand that companies have and that directly involve the services that an accounting firm offers.
Considering the above scenario we take the first tip, you should have a specific page for each of the services offered.
These pages need to be explicative and also commercial, when we say that they need to be commercial are saying that the page needs to sell the service.
Therefore it is important to facilitate communication with the user providing efficient ways of contact and persuasive content and informative at the same time.
Another tip is to work well the page will talk about the history of the office, this page can be decisive when choosing the client as tradition and a successful career are essential for those working in this market.
Another important point is also to provide convenience to the user, allow the contact button or budget always shows.
One last tip that can be a great advantage for the site, consider creating a web application within the site to provide important information to their customers in the form of reports.
Developing already in mind this type of application can be a deciding factor in choosing between one or the other accounting firm.
Develop a website for accounting office using Scriptcase and can easily implement all these tips, you can also easily develop an application integrated to it using the resources we make available on our tool.
Get more results, develop your website using Scriptcase.

The post Development Tips – Accounting Firm appeared first on Scriptcase Blog

.

develop your website using Scriptcase

Each market has a different kind of demand, thinking it is important to keep in mind that the type of content offered and the needs that each user must also differ.
When we talk about accounting firms relate the services they offer the corporate need.
The control of cash flow, for example, is a type of demand that companies have and that directly involve the services that an accounting firm offers.
Considering the above scenario we take the first tip, you should have a specific page for each of the services offered.
These pages need to be explicative and also commercial, when we say that they need to be commercial are saying that the page needs to sell the service.
Therefore it is important to facilitate communication with the user providing efficient ways of contact and persuasive content and informative at the same time.
Another tip is to work well the page will talk about the history of the office, this page can be decisive when choosing the client as tradition and a successful career are essential for those working in this market.
Another important point is also to provide convenience to the user, allow the contact button or budget always shows.
One last tip that can be a great advantage for the site, consider creating a web application within the site to provide important information to their customers in the form of reports.
Developing already in mind this type of application can be a deciding factor in choosing between one or the other accounting firm.
Develop a website for accounting office using Scriptcase and can easily implement all these tips, you can also easily develop an application integrated to it using the resources we make available on our tool.
Get more results, develop your website using Scriptcase.

The post Development Tips – Accounting Firm appeared first on Scriptcase Blog

.